Vessels of Honor

Therefore if anyone cleanses himself from the latter, he will be a vessel for honor, sanctified and useful for the Master, prepared for every good work. —2 Timothy 2: 21

Vessels were quite common in Bible days. Some, made of gold or silver, were used for decorative purposes. Others were made of clay and used for anything from carrying water to holding garbage or wastewater. Thus, some were called vessels of honor, and some vessels of dishonor. 

Take a moment and ask yourself, "What are the contents of my life?" Are the things filling your life pure, or are they wastewater? 

You have been made to contain God.

God has chosen to fill a clay pot—you—with the most valuable thing in existence—Himself. He wants to fill you with Himself so that you overflow His grace, mercy, and love to a thirsty world. 

Paul wrote to Timothy about men in the church who were subverting the people with faulty teaching. These men had become vessels of dishonor. God could not use them; their doctrine was impure. They taught their own concepts rather than the truths of God, and in this way, they tainted the contents of their lives with their own flavor. 

How easy it is to become a vessel of dishonor! All one must do is to stop cleansing their mind each day. But if you want to be a vessel of honor, fit for the Master's use, then you need to flee the lust of the flesh. You have to commune with God at the end of every day and ask Him to cleanse you anew. 

God, make us vessels of honor, that we would pour forth 

Your grace to the world around us. 

Cleanse us and use us, Lord. 

Amen.